Friday, November 6, 2015

Maple Society



Last week I attended the North American branch of the International Maple Society's annual meeting held at the Oregon Garden.* We listened to speakers in the morning, then set out for visits to private gardens and wholesale nurseries. All of the gardens were humble but very interesting, and they included plants relatively new to horticulture, as well as venerable old specimens. The wholesale nurseries also featured many new (to America) plants, but the quality at the companies certainly varied, with Munn Nursery by far my favorite. Needless to say, Carl Munn is a grower of Japanese maples, and some of the sizes he peddles are enormous.

*Upon arriving at the Oregon Garden I discovered a note that my 9-year-old daughter slipped into my briefcase:





Dear part-time Papa,
I hope you will have a fun time at the Maple Society, but I still will miss you. Did I spell society right? I am crying right now but I will feel better later. Love you french toast [i.e. the most – more than french toast].
Your youngest,
Saya

You won't learn anything today because I'm sparing you from my usual verbiage, but hopefully some plant photos from the three-day event will interest you.


Deerly Missed Garden




Owner Pat Eckerdt with Abies nordmanniana 'Golden Spreader'


Polyspora longicarpa 'Full Moon'







 
















Heptacodium miconioides


Arbutus unedo


Prunus serrula




























Munn Nursery




Acer palmatum 'Seiryu'


Acer palmatum 'Seiryu'


Acer pentaphyllum

Acer truncatum 'Fire Dragon'






















Acer shirasawanum var. tenuifolium


Acer palmatum 'Ogon sarasa'







Schreiner's Garden


Cyperus papyrus


Betula albosinensis
Cunninghamia lanceolata





























Quercus durata




Thuja orientalis








































Ricinus communis





Sebright Garden


Aesculus neglecta 'Erythroblastos'



Plumosa multilobum
Pyrossia hastata


























Magnolia laevifolia



Cotinus coggygria 'Old Fashioned'
Ginkgo biloba 'Jehoshaphat'















































Clerodendrum trichotomum 'Variegatum'



Brunnera 'Alexander's Great'
Cyrtomium fortunei  var. clivicola



























Whitman Farms Nursery


Acer buergerianum























Asimina triloba 'Sunflower'



Acer palmatum 'Germaine's Gyration'


Acer palmatum 'Germaine's Gyration'


Fraxinus excelsior 'Aurea'
Cornus nuttallii 'Colrigo Giant'


























Cercidiphyllum japonicum 'Heronswood Globe'



Hamamelis vernalis 'Sandra'
Morus macroura



























Oxydendrum arboreum



Oregon Garden


Acer palmatum 'Sango kaku'

Cotinus 'Grace'

Paulownia tomentosa

Fothergilla gardenii (left) and Euonymus japonicus 'Silver King' (right)

Quercus garryana (Heritage Oak)

Euonymus fortunei

Rhododendron 'Evening Glow'

Tsuga heterophylla 'Thorsen'

Dahlia 'Chilson's Pride'

Larix gmelinii 'Romberg Park'

Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Torulosa Dwarf' with mutation







Although there are some nice specimens at the Oregon Garden, I won't judge the overall quality of the experience because I never want the Flora Wonder Blog to end on a negative note; but I basically copy travel writer Jan Morris' comment about Oakland, California, that "There is no there there."

"Come on, Talon, the Oregon Garden is not so bad. Remember, you once said that any garden is better than no garden."


2 comments:

  1. If you want a "there" at the Oregon Garden go to the conifer section!

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  2. You mean James Humphrey Morris? I think that is a Gertrude Stein quote. Either way - yes the Oregon Garden has grown 10 fold.

    ReplyDelete